The Coastlands

Images of Harpy Eagles, Guianan Cock-of-the-Rocks and Scarlet Macaws often lead birdwatchers in Guyana to focus on the country’s interior, where places like the Iwokrama Forest of Rupununi Savannah harbour some of the world’s most exotic bird species.

But those who skip Guyana’s coast – especially in and around the capital city of Georgetown – miss out on some spectacular birding, including some species that can’t be found in the interior.

Some favourite spots of local and international birders alike include the Georgetown Botanical Gardens, the Capital’s bird sanctuary ; the Mahaica River for good looks at the primitive Hoatzin; the Abary River trail, where the Blood-colored Woodpecker is regularly seen; and some mudflats along the Atlantic Coast or Demerara River to see shorebirds including the Scarlet Ibis. Extending from Venezuela in the west to Suriname in the east, Guyana has more than two hundred miles of Atlantic Coastline. Although most of this region is below the level of the sea at high tide, it is home to ninety percent of Guyana's total population. The coastlands can be divided into three general habitats: coastal forest and mangrove; cultivated lands; and populated areas. The seashore at low tide also accommodates many migrant species after their long journey from other regions of the Neotropics.

Click here to learn more about the birds of the coastlands.

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