Featured Birding

Enjoy our special features about the rare, unusual and special birds of Guyana, and be sure to check back often as we continue to highlight more species.

event1 According to many top Neotropical birdwatchers, Guyana is one of the best places in South America to see several highly sought-after species of Cotingas, including Crimson Fruitcrow, Guianan Red-Cotinga, Dusky Purpletuft, Capuchinbird, and Guianan Cock-of-the-Rock. After a one-week birdwatching trip through Guyana, during which the group saw 11 species of Cotingas, the writer Simon Papps declared Guyana “Cotinga Central” in the February 2007 issue of Birdwatch magazine. More

event1 The Guianan Cock-of-the-Rock (Rupicola rupicola) is one of those uniquely plumed birds that can be easily identified by birders of all levels. It could also be considered the face of Guyana, and with the male’s brilliant orange colorings, complete with an attention-grabbing Mohawk, it’s no wonder it graces the covers of so many tourism brochures. Guianan Cock-of-the-Rocks are polygamous; an attribute that has given rise to a unique courtship performance that is one of their most recognizable behaviors.More

event1 With weights reaching 18 pounds, a wingspan of more than six feet, and a healthy diet of mammals including sloths and monkeys, the world’s largest eagle is often referred to as the “flying wolf.” Harpy Eagles (Harpia Harpyja) are becoming increasingly rare in the wild, but Guyana still provides a refuge for this endangered species. In fact, Guyana’s relatively large population of Harpy Eagles caught the attention of National Geographic who filmed the documentary, Flight of the Harpy Eagle, in Guyana.More

event1 The Hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) is a strange primitive bird. Its plump body and reddish-brown feathers may not appear antediluvian, but the bird’s blood-red eyes set in patches of bright blue skin and unruly crest of long feathers are throwbacks to another time. The Hoatzin is such a bizarre species that after being shuffled through several bird orders, including the Gruiformes, Galliformes, and the Cuculiformes, researchers eventually put it in its own order: the Opisthocomidae.More

event1 Due to habitat loss (often attributed to deforestation) and the trappings of birds for the wildlife trade, the Parrot family has one of the highest numbers of endangered or threatened species of birds in the world. Wild populations are dwindling in many of their native habitats, but within Guyana’s stronghold of tropical forests, Parrot species are fairly numerous and the birds can be quite easy to spot. Guyana has 28 different species of Parrots, including six species of Macaws; six species of Parakeets; six species of Parrotlets; and ten species of Parrots.More

event1The Red Siskin (Carduelis cucullata) once flourished in Venezuela and Columbia, but more than 150 years of trappings greatly diminished its population in the wild. It was believed to be nearing extinction until April of 2000 when, during a survey of Guyana’s birds, researchers from the University of Kansas and the Smithsonian Institution discovered a population of several thousand Red Siskins in southern Guyana. Guyana is one of the few places left offering birders an excellent chance at viewing this endangered bird.More

event1The Rufous-winged Ground-cuckoo (Neomorphus rufipennis) is known to be a difficult bird to spot in the field, but those birders lucky enough to have already ticked this one off likely couldn’t stop talking about its mix of vibrant colors. Now that birdwatchers are seeking them out, sightings of the bird are becoming more common in Guyana. In fact, these birds can now be found with a degree of regularity in the Iwokrama Forest area (especially around Surama village) and this could possibly be the best place to see any members of this family in South America.More

event1 Found only in the Neotropics, the entire Antbird family contains almost 300 species. Serious birders love to find Antbirds – amongst the more challenging families in South America – but they can be tough to see well as some spend their entire lives in the forest canopy while others spend their time creeping around on the forest floor. Identifying them by voice is often key, but with 59 different species of Antbird, Antwren, Antpitta, Antthrush, and Antshrike, Guyana is a great place to actually see these difficult-to-find birds.More

Latest News

  • Message from Hon. Ministe...

    Guyana, South America Undiscovered A tea

    View
  • Guyanas reputation as a s...

    The selection of Water and Sustainable D

    View
  • Message from Hon. Ministe...

    The selection of Water and Sustainable D

    View
  • Cuisine...

    Dining in Guyana is all about our eclect

    View